Description of the Course

 

Course unit title:

Genocide Studies – Legal and Historical Analysis of the Holocaust in the Visegrad Countries

Institution
: University of Sarajevo – Faculty of Law, Department of Legal History

Semester: Spring 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19

Type of Completion: examination and final essay

Type of course unit: elective

Level of course unit: first cycle of studies – undergraduate/bachelor

Year of study: 8th semester/ 4th year

Number of ECTS credits allocated: 2 ECTS (15 weeks/ 2h per week)

 

Course guarantor:

Doc. Edin Halapić, Ph.D., Assistant professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

 

Names of host institution lecturer(s):

Prof. Fikret Karčić, Ph.D., Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

Doc. Edin Halapić, Ph.D., Assistant professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

Ehlimana Memišević, LL.M. Teaching assistant at the Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

 

Guest lecturer(s):

Dr. hab. Jolanta Amrosewicz- Jacobs, Dyrektor Centrum Badani Holokaustu (Poland)

Prof. PhDr. Pavel Barša, M.A., Ph.D., Department of Political Science, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

 

Learning outcomes of the course unit:

The course will examine the history of the Holocaust within a multi-contextual legal comparative approach in the Visegrad countries: Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, and Poland. The first cluster of the course will focus on the overarching issues and interpretations of the Holocaust, the fate of Jewish and non-Jewish victims during the Nazi era, in each of the V4 countries. The classes will also touch upon the major debates in relevant legal historiography, as well as the narratives and controversies regarding the memory of the Holocaust in all respective countries, and in the region as a whole.

The second cluster will explore the various features and phenomena of the Holocaust, in different temporal and geographical contexts of the V4 countries.

This interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary course incorporates impulses from legal history as well as from the social sciences. It will revolve around four major subject matters:

The first issue concerns the conditions and circumstances related to conceptualization of the Holocaust in the V4 countries. The second looks at what happened once genocide has been set into motion and closely examines the further course of events in Visegrad countries. The third issue looks at the consequences: what happened with and between different societies of the V4 countries after an episode of mass violence and genocide. The fourth concerns with analyzing the mechanisms for the prevention and combating of genocide, as well as drawing lessons for the future (inter alia remembrance, reconciliation, narratives, facing the past).

The curriculum includes an in-depth thematic discussion of the Visegrad post-Holocaust context, the links between war and genocide, as well as of ideology, the power of the state and bureaucracy, and propaganda and mass media in relation to genocide in all V4 countries. Other topics for discussion are the legal approach to and processing of genocide and how later generations have interpreted Holocaust in the V4 countries. These will be compared with other mass atrocities in the 20th century, the Rwandan Genocide, the Armenian Genocide, Cambodia, Bosnia and other contemporary cases.

Mode of delivery: face-to-face

Planned learning activities and teaching methods: lectures, seminars, panel discussions.

Prerequisites and co-requisites: none, all 4th year students are invited to participate

Language of Instruction: English and Bosnian

Assessment methods and criteria: final essay – 5000 words and the research topic presentation (20 points), attendance and active participation in classes and seminars (30 points), midterm exam (20 points) and an oral exam (30 points).

 

Grading scale:

A=Excellent (>95%),

B=Very Good (87-94%),

C=Good (79-86%),

D=Satisfactory (71-78%)

E=Adequate (65-70%),

Fx=Insufficient (<65%),

F=Fail (did not fulfill the study requirements).

 

 

Course Contents:

 

No

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Code Mode, dates and location Lecture unit Specific content Lecturer(s)
1. IUR Lecture (2 h) Introductory Lecture on Conceptualization of Genocide and the Holocaust General introduction to the course; overview of the course contents; overview of the study requirements and the assessment criteria. Doc. Edin Halapić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

2. IUR  

Lecture (2h)

Introduce Concept of Genocide Studies;

 

How to Research Genocide and Holocaust

Understanding the definition of Genocide and the Holocaust. Theories of Genocide, an introduction to and analysis of some of the main theoretical explanatory models of genocide: elite, social psychology, political culture, regimes, ideology, modernization, collective identity construction. What is a group? What groups are included under the Genocide Convention? The significance and reinterpretations of the issues of groups, intent and destruction as total and in part. An overview look at genocide stages classification, symbolization, dehumanization, organization, polarization, preparation, extermination, and denial; Deepening the knowledge of genocide research; Conditions and circumstances that may give rise to genocide; Holocaust in Comparative Perspective in the V4 countries.  

 

 

 

 

Prof. Fikret Karčić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

3. IUR Lecture (2h) Genocide in 20th. Century Brief overview of genocide in history from ancient times to the present; how does genocide differ from other types of mass violence, such as massacres, war crimes, crimes against humanity? Related terminology: ethnic cleansing, massacres, extremely violent societies, etc. What are the differences and their significance? Deepening the knowledge of genocide in Armenia, Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Herzegovina in comparative perspective. What is genocide and what is Holocaust? What is the relationship between human rights and mass genocide?  

 

 

Doc. Edin Halapić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

 

 

4. IUR Lecture (2h)  

Visegrad Countries and the Holocaust: From Scarcity to Environment to Reordering Populations

 

A Framework for Analysis and Comparison

Understanding the experience of Visegrad countries during the Holocaust; introductory remarks: What is the relationship between WW2 and Holocaust? How does Holocaust differ from other types of mass violence? The role of ideology, the state, leaders, and war: necessary or sufficient conditions. Making professional killers: the mentality of the perpetrators and the dynamics of destruction. Chains of complicity: “ordinary people” as witnesses, beneficiaries, opponents, collaborators, resistors, and bystander. The Holocaust through the victims’ eyes: struggles for life, dignity and memory  

 

 

Prof. Fikret Karčić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

5. IUR Lecture (2h) Does History Teach any Lessons? Research on Holocaust in Poland Focus on Polish experience during the Holocaust. Prelude of the Holocaust – the persecution of Jews in Germany under Nazi rule (1933-1939). Examination of “human dimension” of genocide – on survivors’ felt experiences of genocidal acts and the specific types of psychological and socio-cultural consequences that are attributed to them. Dr. hab. Jolanta Amrosewicz- Jacobs, Dyrektor Centrum Badani Holokaustu

 

Jagiellonian University Cracow

6. IUR Lecture (2h) Polish Perspectives and Experiences Jewish ghetto in occupied Europe – Endlösung – “final solution of the Jewish question” (1942 – 1945). Other victims of the Third Reich (Roma, Jehovah’s Witnesses). Consequences of the Holocaust. The immediate, long-term and trans-generational impact of traumatic experiences associated with genocidal rape and other atrocities committed against women and children. Issues related to existing models of trauma and approaches to studying the subjectivity of survival experiences will also be explored.  

Dr. hab. Jolanta Amrosewicz- Jacobs, Dyrektor Centrum Badani Holokaustu

 

 

Jagiellonian University Cracow

7. IUR Lecture (2h) International Responses to the Polish Case What is being done and what could have been done. The responsibility of the international community in intervention. Raphael Lemkin, International Military Tribunal (Nuremberg). GA Resolution 96(I). 1948 Genocide Convention. The Eichmann trial. Doc. Edin Halapić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

8. IUR  

First midterm exam on previously taught lessons (20 points)

 

 

. IUR Lecture (2h) Research on the Holocaust in Czech Republic and Slovakia  

Historical background and immediate factors which are culminating in the genocide in the Czech Republic and in Slovakia. Centralized planning and coordination.

Mobilization, deportation and massacre. The Special Organization. The role of Nazi Germany.

 

Doc. Edin Halapić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

10. IUR Lecture (2h) Czech and Slovak Perspectives and Experiences  

 

The Holocaust and its historiography, as well as the background and character of genocide and other forms of mass violence and its effects on individuals in Czech Republic and in Slovakia

Prof. PhDr. Pavel Barša, M.A., Ph.D.

 

Department of Political Science, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague

11. IUR Lecture (2h)  

Perceptions of the Holocaust in the Czech Republic and in Slovakia

 

What is being done and what could have been done, The responsibility of the international community in intervention

Prof. PhDr. Pavel Barša, M.A., Ph.D.

 

Department of Political Science, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague

12. IUR Lecture (2h) Research of the Holocaust in Hungary Analysis of the historical circumstances that led to the Holocaust in Hungary. Doc. Edin Halapić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

13. IUR Lecture (2h) Hungarian Perspective and Experiences Questions as what is the Holocaust and how it is understood in Hungary, why did it occur, how did it work, what were its goals and effects, what were the patterns of action. Theoretical principles of post-Holocaust denial, the motivations of deniers, and the controversy over criminalizing genocide denial vs. freedom of expression.  

Doc. Edin Halapić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

 

 

14. IUR Lecture (2h) Final Remarks on the Experiences in Czech Rep, Slovakia and in Hungary: Genocide Prevention  

History and development of genocide prevention in 20th Century. International Politics and Prevention

Short Term Solutions: The Magic bullets of genocide prevention: Failure of Will, Early warning Systems Humanitarian Intervention, Trials and punishment Sovereignty and the Responsibility to Protect

 

Prof. Fikret Karčić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo

15.  

 

IUR

Lecture (2h) The Holocaust in a Comparative Context — Points of Contention and Consensus in the Field.

 

Overall Comparison of all V4 Countries.

Perspective on all V4 countries

 

–  Forms of dealing with the past and reconciliation,

 

–  Trials,

 

–  Reparations, restitution, -presenting problems, – memory

 

 

Doc. Edin Halapić

 

Faculty of Law, University of Sarajevo